Posted September 1st, 1997

In the News…

The state(s) of giving

Which state’s residents claimed the most charitable deductions in tax year 1995? According to The Chronicle of Philanthropy, Utah ranks number one in the U.S. with the average itemizer’s contribution deduction totaling $4,953. Rounding out the top ten list of the largest states for average charitable deduction for itemizers are Wyoming, Tennessee, Washington, D.C., Mississippi, Texas, Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana, and Oklahoma. Rhode Island, the smallest state, also had the smallest average itemized amount, nearly $1,000 less than the national average charitable deduction of $2,449.

Source: The Chronicle of Philanthropy; July 24, 1997

Fund raisers in high demand

It should be easier to find a job in fundraising these days because there are more jobs to be had. In a survey conducted by the Development Research Group, over 50% of the charitable organizations surveyed said they had created new fundraising positions in 1995-1996. This number is up from 1991’s results of 45%. Additional findings of the survey reveal that organizations prefer to hire experienced fundraising executives who have worked for different kinds of charities. And, if you’re worried that you don’t have a background in business, this survey should ease your mind. Its findings indicate that only 29% of organizations hired individuals with business experience.

Source: The Chronicle of Philanthropy; July 24, 1997

For a free copy of the survey results, write to the
Development Resource Group, 104 East 40th
Street, Suite 304, New York, NY 10016-1801 or
call (212) 983-1600.

“Cultural Creatives”: Emerging social group embraces charitable causes

They are well-educated, affluent, and their average age is 42. Six in ten of them are women and all are concerned with social issues. They are the Cultural Creatives, a new subculture that claims to make up 24% of U.S. adults. One of the most important characteristics of this group is its involvement in charitable pursuits. Three out of four Creatives are volunteering an average of four hours a month. When compared with the national average of six out of ten adults volunteering only two hours per month, the Cultural Creatives are becoming a powerful charitable force in our society. The causes that most Creatives support are usually global in scope and include organizations focusing on community development, environmental and ecological issues, as well as women’s and family issues. Their optimism coupled with a desire to “heal” society both physically and spiritually will no doubt play a large role in the future success of many charitable organizations.

Source: American Demographics, February 1997

The publisher of Give & Take is not engaged in rendering legal or tax advisory service. For advice and assistance in specific cases, the services of your own counsel should be obtained. Articles in Give & Take may generally be reprinted for distribution to board members and staff of nonprofit institutions and other non-donor groups. Proper credit must be given. Call for details.

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