Posted March 1st, 1999

In The News…

Millions ‘going to the dogs’–and cats!

Billionaire software CEO David Duffield has given $200 million to help stray dogs and cats find homes. Duffield and his wife, Cheryl, have created the Duffield Family Foundation to distribute the funds to animal shelters across the country.

The Duffields’ love for their own dog, Maddie, was reportedly a motivating factor behind the gift. Duffield said that Maddie gave him “unconditional love” during the difficult times he experienced as he built his company, PeopleSoft.

Duffield has also promised a $1 million bonus to shelters and other animal agencies that eliminate animal euthanasia within their organizations in a four-year period.

Source: Philanthropy Journal Alert, January 6, 1999

Out with the old, in with the older

According to statistics from the American Association of Retired Persons, older Americans are continuing to live longer than their ancestors at the beginning of the century. An AARP report shows that in 1997 the 65-74 age group (consisting of 18.5 million people) was eight times larger than in 1900. Even more dramatic are the data for the older age groups: the 75-84 age group (11.7 million) was 16 times larger in 1997 than at the turn of the century, and the 85 and older group (3.9 million) was an astounding 31 times larger.

The sharp increase in the older population is attributed to lower infant and young adult mortality over the years. The report also predicts future growth in the number of older Americans as the baby boomers reach age 65. By the year 2030, there may be 70 million Americans age 65 and older, more than twice the number reported in 1997 (34.1 million). These figures point out the need for America’s nonprofit organizations and institutions to be prepared to serve an increasingly older donor population as they form a critical core of support in the future. Institutions of higher learning are already beginning to see large increases in the number of alumni over the age of 65 as the World War II generation, the first to benefit in large numbers from higher education, retires.

Source: “A Profile of Older Americans: 1998,” a publication of AARP

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