Protect Your Donors From Coronavirus Scams

An unfortunate side effect of the coronavirus pandemic has been an uptick of scams looking to exploit the fear and uncertainty many of us are feeling. Those most vulnerable are seniors, who are often the target of scammers, especially now as they are most vulnerable to the virus itself. As charitable organizations, it is important to keep your donor base informed about these dangers.

Types of Scams

A variety of tactics are being used to bait unsuspecting victims to give money or disclose private information. Scams under the ruse of offering COVID-19 cures and treatments, distributing relief payments, selling or delivering in-demand goods like cleaning products and medical supplies and raising money for coronavirus related causes are increasing.

These attempts might take the form of a robocall, email or text. Communications often urge immediate action to receive critical information or to send money by clicking on a link or providing personal information. To combat these attempts, it is best to ignore and to not engage with unfamiliar contacts.

Your donors and even your colleagues could also be susceptible to phishing attempts, or texts and emails that appear to be from recognized contacts or organizations that are designed to install malware on your device. Avoid clicking on links or downloading attachments from unverified sources.

What Can You Do?

Your donors, particularly your planned giving donors, are the most vulnerable. There are a few steps your organization can take to help safeguard your donors from malicious attempts to take advantage of their vulnerability.

  1. 1. Warn your donors about potential scams. Informing your donors of scamming tactics may help them recognize they have been targeted.

    2. Maintain or increase communication with donors. Keeping in touch with your donors can not only strengthen your relationship, it can also help prevent your donors from falling prey to scams. Frequent communication allows your donors to recognize what legitimate communications look like.

    3. Remind donors of your policies for collecting gifts and personal information. Inform your donors of your organization’s policies and procedures for collecting donations and valuable information online, by phone and by mail. Also, remind your donors of contact information for you and your staff, so they can recognize false names, emails and addresses.

There will likely be a rise in scam attempts within the next few weeks as Americans begin receiving their economic impact payments. You can report coronavirus related scam attempts directly to the federal government here. The best way to protect your donors is to stay in touch.

Click here for more information on coronavirus scam attempts from the FTC.
 
By Ainsley Willis, Sharpe Group Editor
 

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Deduct 100% of Your Income With Charitable Gifts in 2020

The CARES Act allows individuals to deduct up to 100% of income in 2020 using charitable gifts of cash.1 To get this treatment, the deductible charitable gift must be a “qualified contribution.”

What is a qualified contribution? First, the taxpayer must elect this treatment for the gift.2 Also, the gift can’t go to a donor advised fund or a supporting organization.3 Finally, a qualified contribution requires:

  1. (i) such contribution is paid in cash during calendar year 2020 to an organization described in section 170(b)(1)(A)

To break it down, a qualified contribution is a deductible contribution that is:

  1. “paid in cash”
  2. “during calendar year 2020”
  3. “to an organization described in section 170(b)(1)(A)” (i.e., a public charity)

Let’s consider some examples:
 
Gift 1 – Cash

I donate a $1,000 check to a public charity on December 1, 2020. I deduct $1,000.

Is this $1,000 deductible contribution a “qualified contribution”?

Yes. All three elements are there.

 
Gift 2 – Quid pro quo cash

I donate a $1,000 check to a public charity on December 1, 2020, in exchange for admission to a gala dinner worth $100 according to IRS guidelines. I deduct $900.

Is this $900 deductible contribution a qualified contribution?

Yes. The $900 is a contribution paid in cash during calendar year 2020 to a public charity. The $100 is not a contribution. It is just payment for the dinner. In other words, the $100 part was a sale not a gift. Of course, we don’t have specific guidance here, but there is no reason to expect that such a gift would be treated differently. (There are areas where we can’t have benefits going to the donor, but those relate to private foundations, donor advised funds and certain charitable trusts, so they are not an issue here.)
 
What about charitable gift annuities and charitable remainder trusts funded with cash? For the rest of the story click here.
 
By Professor Russell James, J.D., Ph.D., CFP®, Texas Tech University

 
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1 SEC. 2205. Modification of Limitations on Charitable Contributions During 2020.
2 “(ii) the taxpayer has elected the application of this section with respect to such contribution.”
3 “(B) EXCEPTION.—Such term shall not include a contribution by a donor if the contribution is—
(i) to an organization described in section 509(a)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, or (ii) for the establishment of a new, or maintenance of an existing, donor advised fund (as defined in section 4966(d)(2) of such Code).”

Navigating Times of Change: Part II – Togetherness

Meet Rosemary (as in “don’t you wish you had stay at home orders in Rosemary Beach right now”)

You just call on me brother, when you need a hand
We all need somebody to lean on
I just might have a problem that you’ll understand
We all need somebody to lean on
Lean on me, when you’re not strong
And I’ll be your friend
I’ll help you carry on
For it won’t be long
‘Til I’m gonna need
Somebody to lean on
Bill Withers (Lean on Me)

In our first blog of this series, we shared some thoughts on the importance of kindness to others—and yourselves—during these trying times. Today we will delve a little more into looking at and thinking about the big picture of how this pandemic is affecting your nonprofit and what you can do about it.

 

What can I do for my nonprofit now?

Regardless of position or what role you play, it is always important to desire to understand more about the positions you don’t play.

In the simplest of terms, nonprofits can be divided into three categories:

  1. 1. Program or mission work: those who spend resources wisely and effectively.

    2. Development or Fundraising: those who raise resources efficiently.

    3. Administration or bean counting: those who count and report resources.

Those of us who have devoted much of our careers to working for nonprofits know how critical each role is and how every employee’s job is interdependent on others. Above all, we are all working toward a common goal: furthering our mission.

We are all familiar with the idea that a nonprofit’s greatest asset is its people. If this is true, then understanding the roles that Fundraising and Program play is fundamental to the Administration function.

What does all this mean?

In a world that tends to build silos in organizations, everyone can play a vital role to breaking them down so your nonprofit’s greatest asset—its people—may work more effectively together.

How can this be accomplished and why is it important now?

These days spent in quarantine are a perfect time to communicate with your staff or coworkers and let them know how much you believe in them. You might ask how you might help them perform their jobs better. Take the proactive stance of communicating by phone, FaceTime, Zoom, email or text. Really listen to what they have to say.

Over the years, I have discovered that the desire to better understand the Development staff and their frustrations has naturally led to better relationships, which has led to Development wanting to understand the budget and accounting rules of the organization (co-author Bob’s area of expertise). When Program, Development and Administration strengthened our relationships, silos started to disappear, and the executive team was able to focus more on our long-term vision, and everyone benefitted.

Your final takeaway and a recommendation:

  1. 1. Take time now to understand others in your organization because this is the perfect time to do just that. Lean on each other. Build each other up. Break down those silos.

    2. If you have run out of shows to watch or stream, I highly recommend The Biggest Little Farm (Hulu). In watching it you may discover how your organization might be in better sync through working together. Enjoy!

 
By Bob Mims, Sharpe Group CFO, and Tom Grimm, Sharpe Group Senior Consultant
 
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Today in Perspective…Preparing For Tomorrow

Some former crises:

  • 1974: OPEC surfaces…gasoline jumps to $1 per gallon…people start stealing food.
  • 1976: Swine flu…the virus crisis that wasn’t.
  • 1987: A 20% one-day drop in the Dow.

The painful crises of the 1970s and 1980s are mostly forgotten. The current crisis, I expect, is going to have long-lasting effects, like the Great Depression.

In some ways, the current crisis is arguably worse than the Great Depression.

During the Great Depression, there were bread lines and social unrest. But one could get a haircut, eat in a restaurant, go to a dance or the movies, spend a day at the beach and have family members over for dinner.

People interacted normally.

Once coronavirus fades and government presence in everyday life retreats, “gaps” will need closing. Charities will be needed.

For charities, will “All clear!” mean back to business as usual? Not if society doesn’t simply return to the way it was.

In which case, charities will have to come up with new ways of reaching out to donors.

For example, a glowing message on glossy paper may not be well received in some quarters.

Maybe a good business opportunity will be producing anti-viral glossy paper for charities’ annual reports.

By Jon Tidd
 

CARES Act Communication

In response to the health and financial crisis caused by the coronavirus global pandemic, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act has been enacted. The law presents a plan for the government to aid Americans and businesses during these uncertain times. Among the charitable giving provisions, it includes a temporary, partial “above the line” charitable deduction for cash gifts (up to $300) in 2020 to encourage gifts by taxpayers who are unable to itemize under current tax law. The legislation also modifies the limitation on qualified charitable gifts of cash to 100% of AGI for itemizers in 2020.

To help you communicate these provisions with your donors, Sharpe Group has created a new brochure, The CARES Act: Good News When We Need It Most, which outlines all provisions affecting charitable giving in an easily digestible format. This brochure makes an ideal and welcome message to all current and prospective donors, especially in a targeted soft appeal to your gift planning prospects. It can also serve to educate your board, volunteers and staff.

Click here to learn more.
 

Sharpe Group will continue to post helpful information for you here on our blog and on our social media sites. If this blog was shared with you and you wish to sign up, you can do so at www.SHARPEnet.com/blog.

We can be found on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn @sharpegroup.

We welcome questions you’d like us to address. Email us at info@SHARPEnet.com and we’ll share your question and our thoughts in this blog and on social media.

Planned Giving Marketing During the Coronavirus: What History Tells Us

Sharpe clients are asking about planned giving marketing efforts. Asking if they should hold off and delay until the COVID-19 crisis has passed. We are not in as uncharted territory as some might think.

A recent article in Financial Advisor IQ reports that attorneys are being inundated with requests to prepare wills, trusts and other estate planning documents, often on an emergency basis. Clients are often asking for this to be done remotely for those who are ill or unable to travel. A recent article in USA Today reported on the same phenomena.

This is exactly what Sharpe expected to occur.

We saw a similar situation immediately after 9/11 when it was clear that the world had suddenly changed. People did not know what was coming next; we were all glued to our TV screens, and the economy was entering a serious downturn.

Issues of mortality were front and center. There was a real concern that this might be just the first of many attacks. Many charities froze in place, and planned giving efforts often stopped entirely.

Charities that had estate planning educational materials in the mail at that time obtained a very strong response. The issues of life and death were suddenly urgent. They were squarely in front of us all. Interest in estate planning exploded.

Much of fundraising is about creating deadlines and trying to get donors to act. With planned giving, this is difficult. External forces are creating this deadline, and we may be of particular service to our donors looking to update their estate plans.

This is a time of both opportunity and risk. When donors make or change their estate plans, we want to be in front of them and get into those plans. And, we want to stay in their plans if we are already there. This is a time when charities previously named in the will may be removed.

When people update their plans, they usually make multiple changes. Keeping your organization in front of them by offering assistance and educational materials is critical to getting into those plans. It will also reinforce the need to keep you in existing plans.

There is little doubt that we are in a period of heightened interest in estate planning topics of all sorts. The people most at risk for the coronavirus are seniors over age 70. These are our natural planned giving constituents and prospects.

Let me offer a few more thoughts based on my decades of working in the direct mail world.

  • Studies show that people have historically spent about the same amount of time with their physical mail every day. During this pandemic, people have more time at home due to the lockdown. They have more time to read estate planning materials. Focus on estate planning topics that are educational in nature. Ask them to include you in their plans, but make it a soft ask, along with helpful tips.
  • If you don’t have any planned giving newsletters, brochures or other marketing materials in process, this might be a good time to consider initiating an effort or accelerating existing plans.
  • The messaging might be a little different, but the core message of “consider whether it might be a good time to finally update your plans and, by the way, please consider including us in those plans” does not change.
  • Be sensitive. The primary message needs to be educational and the mailing should include a free booklet or other informational offer. The “BTW, please consider including us” should be a soft sell and presented more as an afterthought. Don’t refer to the coronavirus.

Given that people are spending more time at home, this may mean a greater willingness to talk to you when you call to follow up. As few of us are traveling these days, it allows us to take the proverbial lemons and make lemonade.

This is NOT a time to slow down your marketing. This is the time to maintain or accelerate your marketing efforts. Consider repurposing unused travel funds to more marketing.

As always, we are happy to assist you with your efforts in this area.

Stay safe out there, and look for the positives.

By John Jensen, Sharpe Group Senior Vice President and Senior Consultant
 

CARES Act Communication

In response to the health and financial crisis caused by the coronavirus global pandemic, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act has been enacted. The law presents a plan for the government to aid Americans and businesses during these uncertain times. Among the charitable giving provisions, it includes a temporary, partial “above the line” charitable deduction for cash gifts (up to $300) in 2020 to encourage gifts by taxpayers who are unable to itemize under current tax law. The legislation also modifies the limitation on qualified charitable gifts of cash to 100% of AGI for itemizers in 2020.

To help you communicate these provisions with your donors, Sharpe Group has created a new brochure, The CARES Act: Good News When We Need It Most, which outlines all provisions affecting charitable giving in an easily digestible format. This brochure makes an ideal and welcome message to all current and prospective donors, especially in a targeted soft appeal to your gift planning prospects. It can also serve to educate your board, volunteers and staff.

Click here to learn more.
 

Sharpe Group will continue to post helpful information for you here on our blog and on our social media sites. If this blog was shared with you and you wish to sign up, you can do so at www.SHARPEnet.com/blog.

We can be found on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn @sharpegroup.

We welcome questions you’d like us to address. Email us at info@SHARPEnet.com and we’ll share your question and our thoughts in this blog and on social media.

Navigating Times of Change: Part I — Kindness

This is Maggie, a licensed service dog who ensures a smile from everyone.

I’m starting with the man in the mirror
I’m asking him to change his ways
And no message could have been any clearer
If you want to make the world a better place
Take a look at yourself, and then make a change
— Michael Jackson (Man in the Mirror)

There are precious few times in our country’s history when everyone experiences a common event that produces forever memories—both good and bad. Two that come to mind are watching the U.S. men’s hockey team defeat Russia in the 1980 Olympics and seeing the plane hit one of the Twin Towers on 9/11.

Even more rare are the times that our entire world shares an experience—this is one of those times.

We are probably all asking ourselves, “What can we do as human beings trying to navigate these times of change?” Specifically, what can we do as men and women whose careers are dedicated to working for our country’s nonprofit organizations and institutions where our common, overarching mission is to make the world a better place with our work, whether through education, social service, the environment, health care…the list goes on.

We are going to humbly try to tackle these questions here and in this series.

What Can We Do in the Here and Now?

We are in the midst of the “all hands on deck figuring out how to navigate the new work-from-home, school-at-home, be-at-home dynamic.” The psychology behind these changes is worth exploring in terms of the impact stress has on our ability to manage work space, school space, living space and, of all things, toilet paper shortages.

What Actually Works?

KINDNESS

Studies have shown that kindness actually reduces stress and anxiety. The researchers found that people who performed daily acts of kindness were less likely to feel stressed. On days when they could not perform even the smallest act of kindness, they reported more stress and negativity.

Practicing kindness in the here and now is less likely to occur (except maybe in the grocery store) in a physical sense because of the need for social distancing. However, there are multiple ways to communicate kindness right now, such as:

  • Sending personal notes of gratitude to your donors telling them how much you value their past support.
  • Calling your donors to check on them—this is also an opportunity to thank them and listen to their needs during this difficult time.
  • Reconnecting with people, both personally and professionally, you may not have seen in years.
  • Taking time to thank your coworkers or sharing with them what they mean to you.

All these small acts of kindness demonstrate the sincere encouragement we all need right now. We hope you have found this helpful.
 

By Bob Mims, Sharpe Group CFO, and Tom Grimm, Sharpe Group Senior Consultant

Next up… Tips for Navigating These Times of Change With Your Staff.
 

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Overcoming Pandemic Communication Challenge

If direct personal contact with your donors is impossible, consider increasing your communications with other methods.

For example, if one of your family members was hurting or isolated, abandoning all communications might add hurt or panic. But with a call, a letter or a personal note, you might offer calm assurance and hope in a dire situation.

Donors are your “family,” and many are thinking about their financial plans because of this pandemic. Your charity can touch the hearts of your donors with telephone calls that are easy to arrange. Personal calls may be welcomed when the caller ID appears with your charity’s name. For small groups of donors, consider conference calls using email invitations. You might also post a video or audio recording on your charity’s website and send out links to it by email. Then, holding a virtual townhall meeting online may fit your donor base if they are technically savvy. Finally, a telephone townhall meeting can be held for thousands of donors who are more accustomed to the phone.

Telephone townhalls can be set up in a short time and may last from 15 to 60 minutes using an outline or prepared script. The supporting marketing firm may call donors a day in advance to announce the meeting and/or at the time of the meeting. Donors could then just press a number to join.

The meeting permits your charity’s spokesperson to express thanks for their support while explaining the actions of your charity during the crisis. The call may be for appreciation, for a specific “ask” or for a “soft ask.” Donors press a number to confirm a gift, a future gift, or to request follow up.

Though donors listen while their phones are muted, they can “raise their hand” by pressing a number for an operator to screen the question and extend it to the speaker. The supporting firm should deliver a written report of who joined the call, responded or committed to action.

Contact Sharpe Group to discuss various donor communication strategies.

By Lewis von Herrmann, Sharpe Group Senior Consultant
 

CARES Act Communication

In response to the health and financial crisis caused by the coronavirus global pandemic, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act has been enacted. The law presents a plan for the government to aid Americans and businesses during these uncertain times. Among the charitable giving provisions, it includes a temporary, partial “above the line” charitable deduction for cash gifts (up to $300) in 2020 to encourage gifts by taxpayers who are unable to itemize under current tax law. The legislation also modifies the limitation on qualified charitable gifts of cash to 100% of AGI for itemizers in 2020.

To help you communicate these provisions with your donors, Sharpe Group has created a new brochure, The CARES Act: Good News When We Need It Most, which outlines all provisions affecting charitable giving in an easily digestible format. This brochure makes an ideal and welcome message to all current and prospective donors, especially in a targeted soft appeal to your gift planning prospects. It can also serve to educate your board, volunteers and staff.

Click here to learn more.
 

Sharpe Group will continue to post helpful information for you here on our blog and on our social media sites. If this blog was shared with you and you wish to sign up, you can do so at www.SHARPEnet.com/blog.

We can be found on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn @sharpegroup.

We welcome questions you’d like us to address. Email us at info@SHARPEnet.com and we’ll share your question and our thoughts in this blog and on social media.

Don’t Give Up on Gift Annuities

Working in the national office of an organization with charitable gift annuity (CGA) donors and annuitants throughout the country, I befriended donors who didn’t have gift planners located in their geographic areas. My desk was basically a call center. And calls about gift annuities came regularly, enough that the organization maintained around 5,000 contracts and more than $100 million in the gift annuity reserves at any one time. Strong and consistent CGA marketing was primarily responsible for this—marketing to people who we knew cared about our organization’s mission. We weren’t offering anything unusual, just the ACGA-recommended rates and a solid organization backing up the annuities.

Among my responsibilities was managing regulatory compliance for fundraising. Keeping up with state requirements for CGAs and corresponding with state regulatory staff members helped me view regulations as beneficial to our organization. State requirements guided us to operate similarly to how an insurance company might operate. Because of this—and program choices made years earlier—our gift annuity reserves were managed in a way that meant they barely suffered during the financial downturn of the Great Recession.

While it’s not unusual for charitable organizations to have to make difficult financial choices, decision-making during the COVID-19 pandemic is exceptional. Even in the best of times, the economics (including benefits and risks) of offering gift annuities may not make sense for many organizations. It also may not be a good time to launch a CGA program. But, for organizations with established programs, I think they should find a way to stay the course. This can be a time to assess, shore up and get ready to make gift annuity promotion a consistent element of planned giving marketing as our economy begins to recover.

Donors who are in their mid-60s and older may be eager for the steady stream of payments from a gift annuity. Before the current economic turmoil began, I’d been noticing retirement planners and other financial professionals promoting commercial annuities as a portion of individual asset allocations. When someone is thinking about an annuity for herself or someone else AND she has an affinity for your organization, why not be the organization that offers her a GIFT annuity?

I’ve also been thinking that members of younger generations will, in the future, take an interest in gift annuities. Young adults are watching—experiencing—topsy-turvy financial markets, are financially cautious—often by necessity—and have generally been raised in a philanthropic culture (starting in preschool with pop can tab collections and trike races). For a well-managed CGA program, there is potential for great success over the long term.

It may be challenging right now for an organization to meet state-required reserve requirements so that it can responsibly continue to offer gift annuities. But, together with the rest of an organization’s planned giving efforts, it’s likely to be worthwhile to find a way to keep offering gift annuities. I think donors will continue to have a palate for them.
 
By Laura Knitt, Sharpe Group Senior Consultant

 

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Fundraising in Uncertain Times

Virtually every fundraising professional with whom I have been in contact recently would agree that it is not business—or philanthropy—as usual.

Since the emergence of a “flu-like” virus in China late last year developed into the COVID-19 coronavirus and a global pandemic, our personal and professional lives have been disrupted in ways that most of us had never predicted.

Social distancing, self-quarantines, shelter in place, vulnerable populations, toilet paper shortages, essential services, supply chain issues and investment and economic concerns are on everyone’s mind, including fundraisers’ and philanthropists’. At this point, most of us are working remotely, eliminating most individual donor visits, cancelling events and travel and trying to determine how best to proceed in this brave new world.

There are plenty of questions about what we should and should not be doing, but professional paralysis is not an answer. Find ways to stay close to your committed core of donors with all the lines of communication that are open to you. Recognize that while we may never have faced a health and economic challenge quite like this before, there have been challenges in the past:

  • Financial panic of 1908.
  • Spanish flu of 1918.
  • Great Depression spanning from 1929 to World War II.
  • Korean and Vietnam Wars.
  • Multiple recessions.
  • Tech boom and bust in the 1990s.
  • Y2K in 2000.
  • 9/11 terrorist attack and the longest war in American history in Afghanistan.
  • Real estate bubble.
  • Great Recession and Financial Crisis of 2009.

Now we have added a global pandemic. Throughout all of these events, Americans have continued to support charitable causes, and, in spite of periodic disruptions, charitable giving has grown over time.

Since 1963, Sharpe Group has seen many economic, health and social challenges that have impacted charitable giving, both positively and negatively. The one constant we have seen is that philanthropy has always prevailed. Evidence that this is and will be the case again is clear from some well-publicized larger gifts from major donors, corporations and foundations. Less publicized are the random acts of kindness and the regular donations to food banks, health and elder care facilities and programs for children. See Solidarity in Solitary.

These are just the early indications that the philanthropic spirit of America will prevail. In the meantime, keep the faith, and find ways to reach your constituents with timely information about what you are doing and how their gifts are impacting your work. And don’t forget to just check in on them, reminding them that we are all in this together.

Contact us at info@SHARPEnet.com if you have any questions about keeping your gift planning program healthy and thriving, and follow our blog for tips and ideas to assist you and your organizations. Also, we want to hear your own good news and stay in touch with you to check in. Please share your own good news stories, and let us share them with others.

We wish good health for you and your loved ones.

By Barlow Mann

 

Sharpe Group will continue to post helpful information for you here on our blog and on our social media sites. If this blog was shared with you and you wish to sign up, you can do so at www.SHARPEnet.com/blog.

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The CARES Act : Harbinger of Seismic Changes to Charitable Giving Incentives?

By Professor Christopher Woehrle, Chair & Professor of Tax & Estate Planning Department, College for Financial Planning, Centennial, Colorado

Among the over 100 provisions of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act are two directly related to charitable giving.

The first is an above-the-line deduction against gross income in the amount of $300 for charitable contributions made after December 31, 2019 by filers taking the standard deduction. Since the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act has eliminated the deductibility of charitable giving for past itemizers now taking the standard deduction, this is welcome news. Although the tax relief is modest, it is a dollar-for-dollar reduction against gross income.

It will be interesting to see if this “universal charitable deduction” will be expanded since it will benefit an estimated 90% of tax filers. Given no sun-setting of this provision, the charitable community can focus on its expansion.

The second is the temporary suspension during 2020 of the AGI limitation for cash charitable contributions to public charities with a specific ineligibility to either donor-advised funds (DAFs) or 509(a)(3) organizations. It is theoretically possible for charitable giving to erase Federal income tax liability for 2020. To the extent such contribution generates a carryforward, it will be available for up to 5 years.

It also may be a warning to the DAF industry as DAFs cannot participate. Congress wants cash going to charity not parceled out over time. Stay tuned!

 

 

Sharpe Group will continue to post helpful information for you here on our blog and on our social media sites. If this blog was shared with you and you wish to sign up, you can do so at www.SHARPEnet.com/blog.

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