Working Together While Staying Apart

For every dark moment in our history, there are countless tales of everyday people coming together to accomplish extraordinary feats. This pandemic is no exception. Manufacturing equipment meant for making legos and baseball uniforms is being modified to produce personal protective equipment for hospitals facing shortages. Countless homemade masks are being sewn and donated by individuals and companies all across the world. Thanks to stay-at-home orders, there are animal shelters with an incredible problem–they are empty! Zoos, aquariums and museums are hosting virtual field trips for quarantined students. Each and every act of kindness matters, and “in the total of all these acts will be written the history of this generation.”

Today, we wanted to again share some of the many encouraging stories of individuals and organizations who are working toward a brighter tomorrow for all.

 

 

 

Stories to Make You Smile

Thanks to Sheltering in Place, Animal Shelters Are Empty

Staff and volunteers at the Palm Beach County animal shelter celebrate that their kennels are empty.
Photo: CNN

13-Year-Old Boy Who Made Bow Ties to Help Animals Get Adopted Is Now Making Masks for Coronavirus

‘All The Internet’s A Stage’ for Quarantined Shakespearean Actors

A 96-year-old WWII Vet Donned a Mohawk to Intimidate the Germans. He Did it Again to Spread Cheer During the Pandemic.

Whidden said, if the virus has one upside, it’s that everybody has started to come together, just like during the war. And if his new silver mohawk can help keep folks’ spirits up, well, that’s a win for the home team.

Memphis Zoo Olympics, aka Memphis ZOOlympics, Is Underway Online

The Cincinnati Zoo’s Fiona the Hippo Is Now Accepting Zoom Calls

College Student Makes Masks for the Deaf & Hard of Hearing

Ashley Lawrence (left) poses with her mother wearing masks made for the deaf and hard of hearing community.

British Veteran Raises $25 million by Walking for Health Service

Factory Team Clocks Out After 28 Days of Live-in Work Making Coronavirus Protective Material

Poplar Springs Celebrates Seniors

Tic-Tac-Toe 3 in a Row: Mother and Daughter Surprise Seniors During the COVID-19 Period

Mother and daughter Addyson and Danielle Garver brought some blue tape and put it on the windows at Winfield Senior Living. The ladies outside and the residents inside each used dry erase markers to play.

 

Helping Hands

Irish Help Raise $1.8 million for COVID-hit Navajo Nation, Repaying $170 Sent During Potato Famine

The tribes had suffered greatly and had very little, but when the Choctaw nation heard about the Irish people’s suffering during the potato famine, they pulled together a donation of $170—$5000 in today’s dollars—to send to Ireland.
Photo: (BBC) Kindred Spirits, a sculpture in the Irish town of Midletown

Salvation Army Helping to Provide Childcare for Essential Workers

Medtronic Makes Ventilator Design Specifications Available to Public to Accelerate Efforts to Increase Global Ventilator Production and Gives $1 Million in Product Donations to Insulin for Life to Support COVID-19 Relief Efforts

‘Parks and Recreation’ Special Has Already Raised $3 Million for Feeding America

CBU Engineering Is Producing Face Shields for Healthcare Professionals

CBU was able to purchase additional 3D printers — including small models that could be located in students’ homes.

#ShareMyCheck: Social Media Users Reveal Where They’re Donating Stimulus Money

Memphis Auto Repair Business to Deliver 950K Masks to Aid First Responders During Outbreak

Across the World, Museums and Educational Institutions Are Rising to the Challenge to Offer Children Incredible Virtual Field Trips

Four Seasons Hotel Offers New York City Medical Workers Free Rooms so They Don’t Infect Their Families With Coronavirus

With Theaters Closed, N.J. Costume Maker Now Sews Innovative Masks for Doctors

Sarah Romagnoli, costume maker at McCarter Theatre Center Costume Shop, making face masks at home.

Publix Is Buying Excess Milk and Produce From Farmers — and Donating it to Food Banks

San Diego Zoo Offering Free Classes for Middle and High Schoolers, Teachers

Vanderbilt University Prepares Hundreds of Rooms for VUMC Medical Workers Fighting Global Pandemic

Nike Donates 30,000 Shoes to Front-line Workers Fighting COVID-19

Nike partnered with Good360, a nonprofit specializing in efficient distribution of product donations, to help deliver the shoes to workers in Chicago, Los Angeles, Memphis, and New York City and within the Veterans Health Administration.

University of Memphis Uses 3D Lab to Print Face Shields for Healthcare Workers

Authors and Celebrities Are Reading to Kids Online During Quarantine

Lego Is Producing 13,000 Face Visors a Day for Healthcare Workers Amid Coronavirus Pandemic

MLB Jersey Provider Fanatics Creating Masks and Gowns for Medical Workers

Rubin said Fanatics has completely halted production on anything other than the masks and gowns, and the company plans to make one million of each to be immediately donated and distributed across Pennsylvania.

Museum of Science and Industry Staff Use 3D Printers to Make Masks, Face Shields for Local Hospitals

How Sports Teams, Players Are Helping Arena, Stadium Workers Affected by COVID-19 Outbreak

The National Parks Conservation Association Is Bring Moments of Beauty and a Few Fun Facts to Park Lovers Stuck at Home

The Rich and Famous Donating Fortunes to Combat COVID-19

John Krasinski Hosted a Star-studded Virtual Senior Prom for the Class of 2020

John Krasinski DJs virtual prom for class of 2020
Photo: @johnkrasinski Instagram


 

Tell us your good news too, and we’d love to share it with others!

At Sharpe Group, we are still here and ready to help you. Our mission says it all: Serving Those Who Serve Society.

-Your Sharpe Group Family

 

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Charitable Remainder Annuity Trusts … Youngsters Need Not Apply

As the saying goes, “age may have its privileges,” but in our current environment of low interest rates, don’t even try to establish a 5% charitable remainder annuity trust (CRAT)—the lowest payout rate permitted—unless:

  1. The donor is at least age 76. (For a two-life trust, at least one of the income beneficiaries must be age 79, while the other can be a youthful age 78.)
  2. You are using the May 2020 §7520 rate of 0.8% with annual payments.

Granted, a donor establishing a charitable remainder trust can use the §7520 rate from the month of the gift or either of the two prior months, whichever is more favorable. However, even using the April 2020 rate of 1.2% only reduces the eligible ages to 75 for a one-life and 77 for two lives.

Giving Alternatives

There are alternatives for charitable giving in this environment:

  • Rather than a CRAT for the life or lives of the income beneficiaries, donors could use a term-of-years trust of up to 20 years. Even using the 0.8% §7520 rate, a 5% annuity trust with quarterly payments for 19 years satisfies the 10% remainder requirement. For donors in their 60s, a 19-year trust may be an attractive option. (And if the beneficiaries die within the 19-year trust term, payments can continue to other family members).
  • Fund a charitable gift annuity instead of a CRAT. The recommended payout for a 65-year-old annuitant is 4.7%. For two 65-year-olds, the rate is 4.2%.
  • For a donor who is not concerned with having a fixed income, the charitable remainder unitrust (CRUT) may be an attractive alternative. With low §7520 rates, the charitable deduction for a CRUT is higher than with the annuity trust. For example, assuming annual payments, a $100,000 gift, a 5% payout rate and the §7520 rate of 0.8%, an 80-year old donor would be entitled to a charitable deduction of $60,102 for a CRAT. The deduction for a CRUT would be $67,635.

Lower Rates Bring Some Good News

Some gift vehicles are more attractive when rates drop:

  • A gift of a remainder interest in a home or farm is more valuable when interest rates are lower. For example, the deduction for a $100,000 parcel of vacant farmland is $87,011 for a donor age 65 using the §7520 rate of 0.8%. At a §7520 rate of 2%, the deduction would be $71,411.
  • Donors who previously established charitable remainder trusts may wish to make additional gifts to charity by assigning their income interests to the remainderman. This generates an additional charitable deduction, which is calculated using the current rate. The combination of the deduction when the trust was established and the deduction for the gift of the income interest may actually exceed the amount transferred to the trust.
  • In a low-interest-rate environment, the charitable lead trust is the real star. Parents hoping to transfer wealth to the next generation can reduce or even eliminate transfer taxes by establishing a non-reversionary charitable lead trust. Low interest rates enable the trust to zero out gift taxes and last for a shorter period and/or use a smaller payout.

By Kathy Sperlak, Technical Advisor
 

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Navigating Times of Change: Part IV – Mindfulness

Little things I should have said and done
I just never took the time
You were always on my mind (you were always on my mind)
You were always on my mind
Willie Nelson (Always on My Mind)

This is part four of our series of navigating in these times of great change. In the first three, we discussed kindness, togetherness and thoughtfulness. Now, we’ll focus on being mindful in the future.

Development for the long term

You may be a development team of one, or you may have a department with more than 100 staff members. It doesn’t matter. In both cases, you should ask the same two questions:

  • What will the fundraising world look like now?
  • What should I be doing now?

Often it is essential to dive right into the details and get those right the first time. It’s precisely what was needed to coordinate the logistics of working from home so we could get down to business quickly. Action takers took the bull by the horns and quickly established home offices and networks.

Now it’s time to step back for a bit to look at the big picture while pondering some vital fundraising questions that will set the tone of your organization’s future success. Allow me to recommend three action steps that you should be taking now:

  1. Communicate, listen and show you care.

    Development should be focusing on ramping up their communication efforts with their constituents. Newsletters, emails, social media and the all-important phone calls are critical to staying in touch with your family of donors. You care about them, and now is an excellent time to reach out to see how they are weathering the storm and how they might be hurting. The tone of your communication is critical. Now is likely not the time for the hard ask. How you communicate will be remembered for a long time. Show you care.

  2. Think strategically about your gift portfolio.

    Most nonprofits have the following types of philanthropy. Below is a list of the estimated frequency of these gift structures and the impact that COVID may have on these types of gifts.

    The gifts listed above include their impact today on organizations, but the current environment suggests there will be long-term implications on giving as a result of this crisis. A COO of a large nonprofit told us their expectation on the impact of giving is similar to what we experienced during the Great Depression, which will most likely be measured in years, not weeks or months.

    (The philanthropy model above does not indicate how nonprofits are utilizing their development resources or how they plan to use these gifts.)

    The graph below shows the varying nature of philanthropy measured on a percentage basis at a group of nonprofits whose names have been removed. It should give the reader a good sense of the demographics of the different types of philanthropy.

  3. Utilize your development resources.

    Measuring and benchmarking development investments are incredibly difficult due, in part, to the varying nature of how nonprofits invest and measure them. It is easy to get bogged down into the details of measurement. Here is some practical advice for allocating your time on development:

    • Develop or review your understanding of your donor base and its demographics.
    • Determine whether your mission can reach other demographics’ desire to give.
    • Invest time and resources in all areas of giving. Events are useful tools for today, and planned gifts could have a monumental impact on your organization’s mission in the future.
    • Think of development as a “donor lifecycle” where you want to communicate and invest in your donor for a lifetime of giving.
    • To ensure balanced success, remember not to ignore any part of your development resources.

Part five of our series will put everything together.

By Bob Mims, Sharpe Group CFO, and Tom Grimm, Sharpe Group Senior Consultant
 

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Too Much of a Good Thing May Be Inefficient, Even if Wonderful!

The COVID-19-triggered financial recession underscores for businesses and individuals the need to hold sufficient cash to ride out the tumult. For individuals with cash, or access to it, there are planning opportunities. With the equity markets well off their highs, now is an especially attractive time to consider a Roth conversion as part of retirement income planning. Those converting almost always have sufficient cash held outside the IRA to pay the taxes attributable to the conversion.

For the converters with philanthropic goals, they may also wish to consider zeroing out their federal income tax liability. The CARES Act allows taxpayers in 2020 to elect to deduct gifts up to 100% of AGI provided those gifts are made with cash to public charities.

Could a donor eliminate their federal income tax liability for 2020 without giving up to 100% of AGI? The short answer will be yes. The most generous charitable donors usually itemize and are also likely to have substantial mortgage interest expense—and perhaps investment interest expense. Their state and local taxes are currently capped at $10,000.

As noted in the chart below, the more tax-efficient strategy would be to contribute up to their taxable income before reducing for charitable contributions. The chart shows giving to 100% of AGI likely will not be needed to eliminate their income tax liability. While any excess contribution could be carried forward, the filer actually parted with more cash than was needed. Now is the time most donors will be looking to conserve cash.
 


 
Financially savvy and philanthropic donors should keep the expanded deductibility top of mind as they are contemplating Roth conversions, which are especially attractive in down capital markets or if they have received a Golden Parachute payment. The goals of guiding others through their giving and seeking charitable support can be compatible.
 

By Professor Chris Woehrle, Chair & Professor of Tax & Estate Planning Department, College for Financial Planning, Centennial, Colorado
 

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Don’t Forget to Write

During this ongoing crisis with COVID-19, many of your donors may be sitting at home as well and could be thinking about their own mortality. Some online planning websites for wills have seen dramatic increases in traffic for those who want to update their plans.

Yet some of your older donors may not be so technically savvy, and they may contact their advisors as soon as this crisis passes. After taking care of loved ones, some people also include a provision for charity in their long-range plans; please let them know that such gifts are sincerely appreciated. A short personal note or card may help your donors remember your organization and how much you appreciate them.

Though phone calls are a key element of keeping in touch when you cannot visit, remember that a handwritten personal note carries much more weight. Why? Because a donor “knows” it took you both time and emotional effort to write the note before mailing it, and they now have a physical piece of paper to carry with them to their advisor(s). They won’t forget your expression of kindness and thanks.

Our older generations (including those as young as the Baby Boomers) grew up with daily mail being one of the most important events of each day. That sense of anticipation and appreciation for personal notes has not waned.

So, don’t forget to write and let your donors know your concern for them!

By Lewis von Herrmann, Sharpe Group Senior Consultant
 

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Navigating Times of Change: Part III – Thoughtfulness

I waited patiently for the Lord
He inclined and heard my cry
He brought me up out of the pit
Out of the mire and clay
I will sing, sing a new song
U2 (40)

In the previous blogs, we discussed the importance of showing kindness to ourselves and others and the importance of togetherness by understanding everyone’s roles. Now it’s time to ponder what might be different on the other side of the pandemic and how we can move forward.
 

Thinking for the long term

Ask a room of 25 staff about their nonprofit’s purpose, and you may get 25 matching answers: “Accomplish our mission.” That is indeed the correct answer, but that answer doesn’t necessarily mean that all resources should be spent on the program after netting out fundraising and administration costs.

This is Bob speaking: Having had multiple opportunities to facilitate strategic planning, I’ve learned to keep communications basic and to the point with nonprofit boards and leadership. Generally speaking, nonprofits can be divided into two categories for strategic planning purposes:

    1. Build and/or maintain your program (or mission).
    2. Build and/or maintain your organization.

From a true strategic planning standpoint, it would be wise to think about the longevity of your overall organization. The sustainability of a nonprofit is paramount to delivering its mission. In other words, if the nonprofit goes under, resources vanish, and the mission can’t be carried out. So, which is more important and deserves our focus: the living out of your mission right now or making plans to sustain your mission?

When nonprofits face economic hardships/downturns in times like we are in, the first thing that is usually cut to remain viable is spending; however, during these downturns, the mission needs of your organization most certainly go up.

This is Bob speaking: A few years ago, I had the opportunity to speak to a group of biologists and engineers. I asked them how they decided to focus on a specific wetland’s preservation project. They walked me through the scientific basis of the project, which was fascinating. However, when I pressed them on the one deciding factor, they gave me varying answers. My reply to them was “don’t you first ask if the project is in the budget?” They unanimously agreed.
 

How can you serve your constituency under this scenario?

We are all conditioned to live by 12-month budgets. A balanced budget means the balance sheet (or the financial strength of the organization) stays the same every year.
If you believe, as a result of the recent economic challenges, you need a more durable balance sheet, consider the following process (thinking long term):

    1. Is it time to think about reserves to weather economic or global downturns?
    2. What are our current reserves (or balance sheet strength; usually measured as unrestricted net assets)?
    3. What should our reserves be in order to balance our essential mission?
    4. Begin budgeting for surpluses; start slowly with a long-term view.
    5. Remember: budgeted surplus can lead to operational surpluses; operational surpluses build the balance sheet.

Above all, spend some time communicating with your team about what your new normal will look like. Seek input from each member of your team. By thinking about the long-term health of your organization in these and other ways, your mission can not only survive but, perhaps, thrive.

 
By Bob Mims, Sharpe Group CFO, and Tom Grimm, Sharpe Group Senior Consultant
 

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Protect Your Donors From Coronavirus Scams

An unfortunate side effect of the coronavirus pandemic has been an uptick of scams looking to exploit the fear and uncertainty many of us are feeling. Those most vulnerable are seniors, who are often the target of scammers, especially now as they are most vulnerable to the virus itself. As charitable organizations, it is important to keep your donor base informed about these dangers.

Types of Scams

A variety of tactics are being used to bait unsuspecting victims to give money or disclose private information. Scams under the ruse of offering COVID-19 cures and treatments, distributing relief payments, selling or delivering in-demand goods like cleaning products and medical supplies and raising money for coronavirus related causes are increasing.

These attempts might take the form of a robocall, email or text. Communications often urge immediate action to receive critical information or to send money by clicking on a link or providing personal information. To combat these attempts, it is best to ignore and to not engage with unfamiliar contacts.

Your donors and even your colleagues could also be susceptible to phishing attempts, or texts and emails that appear to be from recognized contacts or organizations that are designed to install malware on your device. Avoid clicking on links or downloading attachments from unverified sources.

What Can You Do?

Your donors, particularly your planned giving donors, are the most vulnerable. There are a few steps your organization can take to help safeguard your donors from malicious attempts to take advantage of their vulnerability.

  1. 1. Warn your donors about potential scams. Informing your donors of scamming tactics may help them recognize they have been targeted.

    2. Maintain or increase communication with donors. Keeping in touch with your donors can not only strengthen your relationship, it can also help prevent your donors from falling prey to scams. Frequent communication allows your donors to recognize what legitimate communications look like.

    3. Remind donors of your policies for collecting gifts and personal information. Inform your donors of your organization’s policies and procedures for collecting donations and valuable information online, by phone and by mail. Also, remind your donors of contact information for you and your staff, so they can recognize false names, emails and addresses.

There will likely be a rise in scam attempts within the next few weeks as Americans begin receiving their economic impact payments. You can report coronavirus related scam attempts directly to the federal government here. The best way to protect your donors is to stay in touch.

Click here for more information on coronavirus scam attempts from the FTC.
 
By Ainsley Willis, Sharpe Group Editor
 

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Deduct 100% of Your Income With Charitable Gifts in 2020

The CARES Act allows individuals to deduct up to 100% of income in 2020 using charitable gifts of cash.1 To get this treatment, the deductible charitable gift must be a “qualified contribution.”

What is a qualified contribution? First, the taxpayer must elect this treatment for the gift.2 Also, the gift can’t go to a donor advised fund or a supporting organization.3 Finally, a qualified contribution requires:

  1. (i) such contribution is paid in cash during calendar year 2020 to an organization described in section 170(b)(1)(A)

To break it down, a qualified contribution is a deductible contribution that is:

  1. “paid in cash”
  2. “during calendar year 2020”
  3. “to an organization described in section 170(b)(1)(A)” (i.e., a public charity)

Let’s consider some examples:
 
Gift 1 – Cash

I donate a $1,000 check to a public charity on December 1, 2020. I deduct $1,000.

Is this $1,000 deductible contribution a “qualified contribution”?

Yes. All three elements are there.

 
Gift 2 – Quid pro quo cash

I donate a $1,000 check to a public charity on December 1, 2020, in exchange for admission to a gala dinner worth $100 according to IRS guidelines. I deduct $900.

Is this $900 deductible contribution a qualified contribution?

Yes. The $900 is a contribution paid in cash during calendar year 2020 to a public charity. The $100 is not a contribution. It is just payment for the dinner. In other words, the $100 part was a sale not a gift. Of course, we don’t have specific guidance here, but there is no reason to expect that such a gift would be treated differently. (There are areas where we can’t have benefits going to the donor, but those relate to private foundations, donor advised funds and certain charitable trusts, so they are not an issue here.)
 
What about charitable gift annuities and charitable remainder trusts funded with cash? For the rest of the story click here.
 
By Professor Russell James, J.D., Ph.D., CFP®, Texas Tech University

 
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1 SEC. 2205. Modification of Limitations on Charitable Contributions During 2020.
2 “(ii) the taxpayer has elected the application of this section with respect to such contribution.”
3 “(B) EXCEPTION.—Such term shall not include a contribution by a donor if the contribution is—
(i) to an organization described in section 509(a)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, or (ii) for the establishment of a new, or maintenance of an existing, donor advised fund (as defined in section 4966(d)(2) of such Code).”

Navigating Times of Change: Part II – Togetherness

Meet Rosemary (as in “don’t you wish you had stay at home orders in Rosemary Beach right now”)

You just call on me brother, when you need a hand
We all need somebody to lean on
I just might have a problem that you’ll understand
We all need somebody to lean on
Lean on me, when you’re not strong
And I’ll be your friend
I’ll help you carry on
For it won’t be long
‘Til I’m gonna need
Somebody to lean on
Bill Withers (Lean on Me)

In our first blog of this series, we shared some thoughts on the importance of kindness to others—and yourselves—during these trying times. Today we will delve a little more into looking at and thinking about the big picture of how this pandemic is affecting your nonprofit and what you can do about it.

 

What can I do for my nonprofit now?

Regardless of position or what role you play, it is always important to desire to understand more about the positions you don’t play.

In the simplest of terms, nonprofits can be divided into three categories:

  1. 1. Program or mission work: those who spend resources wisely and effectively.

    2. Development or Fundraising: those who raise resources efficiently.

    3. Administration or bean counting: those who count and report resources.

Those of us who have devoted much of our careers to working for nonprofits know how critical each role is and how every employee’s job is interdependent on others. Above all, we are all working toward a common goal: furthering our mission.

We are all familiar with the idea that a nonprofit’s greatest asset is its people. If this is true, then understanding the roles that Fundraising and Program play is fundamental to the Administration function.

What does all this mean?

In a world that tends to build silos in organizations, everyone can play a vital role to breaking them down so your nonprofit’s greatest asset—its people—may work more effectively together.

How can this be accomplished and why is it important now?

These days spent in quarantine are a perfect time to communicate with your staff or coworkers and let them know how much you believe in them. You might ask how you might help them perform their jobs better. Take the proactive stance of communicating by phone, FaceTime, Zoom, email or text. Really listen to what they have to say.

Over the years, I have discovered that the desire to better understand the Development staff and their frustrations has naturally led to better relationships, which has led to Development wanting to understand the budget and accounting rules of the organization (co-author Bob’s area of expertise). When Program, Development and Administration strengthened our relationships, silos started to disappear, and the executive team was able to focus more on our long-term vision, and everyone benefitted.

Your final takeaway and a recommendation:

  1. 1. Take time now to understand others in your organization because this is the perfect time to do just that. Lean on each other. Build each other up. Break down those silos.

    2. If you have run out of shows to watch or stream, I highly recommend The Biggest Little Farm (Hulu). In watching it you may discover how your organization might be in better sync through working together. Enjoy!

 
By Bob Mims, Sharpe Group CFO, and Tom Grimm, Sharpe Group Senior Consultant
 
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Today in Perspective…Preparing For Tomorrow

Some former crises:

  • 1974: OPEC surfaces…gasoline jumps to $1 per gallon…people start stealing food.
  • 1976: Swine flu…the virus crisis that wasn’t.
  • 1987: A 20% one-day drop in the Dow.

The painful crises of the 1970s and 1980s are mostly forgotten. The current crisis, I expect, is going to have long-lasting effects, like the Great Depression.

In some ways, the current crisis is arguably worse than the Great Depression.

During the Great Depression, there were bread lines and social unrest. But one could get a haircut, eat in a restaurant, go to a dance or the movies, spend a day at the beach and have family members over for dinner.

People interacted normally.

Once coronavirus fades and government presence in everyday life retreats, “gaps” will need closing. Charities will be needed.

For charities, will “All clear!” mean back to business as usual? Not if society doesn’t simply return to the way it was.

In which case, charities will have to come up with new ways of reaching out to donors.

For example, a glowing message on glossy paper may not be well received in some quarters.

Maybe a good business opportunity will be producing anti-viral glossy paper for charities’ annual reports.

By Jon Tidd
 

CARES Act Communication

In response to the health and financial crisis caused by the coronavirus global pandemic, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act has been enacted. The law presents a plan for the government to aid Americans and businesses during these uncertain times. Among the charitable giving provisions, it includes a temporary, partial “above the line” charitable deduction for cash gifts (up to $300) in 2020 to encourage gifts by taxpayers who are unable to itemize under current tax law. The legislation also modifies the limitation on qualified charitable gifts of cash to 100% of AGI for itemizers in 2020.

To help you communicate these provisions with your donors, Sharpe Group has created a new brochure, The CARES Act: Good News When We Need It Most, which outlines all provisions affecting charitable giving in an easily digestible format. This brochure makes an ideal and welcome message to all current and prospective donors, especially in a targeted soft appeal to your gift planning prospects. It can also serve to educate your board, volunteers and staff.

Click here to learn more.
 

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